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Dove extends real beauty campaign to teens with Super Bowl spot

NEW YORK - Unilever brand Dove is continuing to break from the traditional beauty marketing mould to launch the next phase of its 'Campaign for Real Beauty' during Super Bowl on Sunday February 5.

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The 45-second spot, called "walking the talk", will draw attention to issues of self-esteem for young women, by hearing girls speaking about their feelings, with one girl saying that she hates her freckles and a dark-haired girl wishing she were a blonde.

Dove's tearjerker ad, created by Ogilvy & Mather, will be in sharp contrast to the party atmosphere of the American Football game and the jokey advertising produced for brands such as Budweiser and Burger King.

It is hoped will bring widespread attention to the issue and promote the Dove Self-Esteem Fund, which was developed to help raise self-esteem in girls and young women.

Philippe Harousseau, US marketing director for Dove, said: "The existing narrow definition of beauty is not only unrealistic and unattainable, but clearly it also creates hang-ups that can lead girl to question their own beauty.

"It's time to free the next generation from these stereotypes and give girls the tools they need to discover their own definition of beauty."

The DSEF in America funds charity ME! in a partnership with the Girl Scouts of the USA, and will be developing self-esteem programming material that will be targeting girls aged eight to 17. In the UK, the fund supports Bodytalk, a joint educational venture with the UK charity, Eating Disorders Association.

The partnership has a three-year plan to educate young girls and boys to understand and deal with their physical appearance through the National Curriculum and workshops.

Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty was developed after a global study found that only 2% of women around the world described themselves as beautiful. Previous advertising campaigns have seen the brand use "real" models to promote their products.

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