Additional Information


Content

Reuters marks fifth anniversary of Iraq invasion

LONDON - Reuters is launching a series of short documentaries on the web, called 'Bearing Witness', marking five years of covering the war in Iraq.

Share this article

'Bearing Witness' features personal stories from Reuters journalists who have been on the frontline, as well as a timeline charting major events, interactive maps and graphs about casualties, troop levels and economics.

Since the Allied invasion in 2003, 100 Reuters correspondents, photographers and cameramen have worked to deliver news from the battlefield and from civilians whose lives have been affected by the conflict. To date, 127 journalists have been killed in the conflict, including seven working for Reuters.

Among those who tell their stories are veteran Middle East correspondent Samia Nakhoul, photographer Goran Tomasevic, and Dean Yates, who presently heads Reuters' Baghdad bureau.

There is also a film using dramatic moving and still footage taken by Reuters staff over the past five years, accompanied by interviews with those who have covered the conflict, including Ceerwan Aziz -- an Iraqi photographer who admits that his family does not know what his job is, because they would think it was too dangerous and ask him to quit.

On March 20 2008, it will be five years since US forces began bombing Baghdad in the "shock and awe" campaign. Saddam Hussein's regime lasted only 21 days into the invasion, but estimates of the number of Iraqi civilians dead due to violence during the first three years range from 48,000 to 600,000.

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Additional Information

Latest jobs Jobs web feed

FROM THE BLOGS

The Wall blogs

Back to top ^