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Brand New Justice: The Upside of Global Branding First Edition

Brand New Justice sets out a case for global branding as a key instrument for forging a fundamental reorientation of world economic trends. Simon Anholt is a well known international branding and marketing thinker, Chairman of Earthspeak consultancy and adviser to various government bodies.

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Through the targeted development and utilization of strong branding techniques, Simon Anholt argues that poorer countries can employ classic rich-nation marketing tricks to turn the forces of global markets to their advantage.

Controversial and thought-provoking analysis of issues that are central to 21st century economic thought; radical new thinking on wealth-creation in the developing world.

Unites world-class branding and marketing knowledge with an emerging-market development agenda.

Concrete answers to the problems of anti-capitalism, medium level poverty and the brand backlash; a way for the marketing and advertising industries to regain respect and a more positive reputation.

Simon Anholt, who was once CEO of the ad agency World Writers, knows his stuff. This book is well-researched and thorough. It's a modest but important proposal -- suggesting that some 'second world' nations can use better marketing to reduce some of the disparities of the global economy, writes Russell Davies, head of planning at Wieden & Kennedy.

He suggests that brands shouldn't simply be regarded as the tools of Western globalising demons -- they could also provide a way for less-developed nations to win an increased share of the global cake. This is a thoughtful addition to the debate about global business and brands.

He's at his best when telling stories from these more unexpected places. Tales of Deepak Kanegaonker in Mumbai and Jiri Kejval in Prague are a welcome reminder that the first world doesn't have a monopoly on entrepreneurialism. And as Anholt points out, the most realistic way for global inequities to be rebalanced is if less-developed nations can charge more for the stuff they export. That means exporting more than raw materials. It means exporting finished goods and keeping the return from the "added value" at home. Which means building brands.

It's heartening to hear of companies from Brazil or Fiji or Croatia competing in the global market place for branded goods. This might begin to distribute wealth and better-paid jobs more evenly around the planet, although as Anholt stresses, there's a lot that this approach won't solve. Many Third World nations are so "less developed" that suggesting they market their way out of their problems would be crass and ridiculous.

If I have a carp about this book, it's about the thorough reasonableness of the whole thing. It's competent, clear and direct, but not as energetic as his topic might demand.

Anholt seems concerned to make sure his case is watertight, so he spends a lot of time pointing out the limits of his argument. This can make the book feel like one big caveat, which dampens what ought to be an inspiring and energising read. He has an interesting and thought-provoking idea, I'd have liked his writing to be as engaging. But that's just a small caveat of my own. It's still well worth reading.

"Anholt's thesis - that the instruments of market growth have simply been in the wrong hands - is compelling and thought-provoking. For countries like Croatia, which strive to market their products abroad, Brand New Justice contains a wealth of valuable advice and some extremely sound economic and social theory."

Stjepan Mesic, President of the Republic of Croatia

For countries like Mongolia, which need to break into international markets, this concept provides some much needed hope and inspiration.

Nambar Enkhbayar, Prime Minister of Mongolia

In brief

Brand New Justice sets out a case for global branding as a key instrument for forging a fundamental reorientation of world economic trends.

Through the targeted development and utilization of strong branding techniques, Simon Anholt argues that poorer countries can employ classic rich-nation marketing tricks to turn the forces of global markets to their advantage.

Recently vilified as the prime dynamic driving home the breach between poor and rich nations, here the branding process is rehabilitated as a potential saviour of the economically underprivileged.

Anholt systematically analyses the success stories of the Top Thirteen nations, demonstrating that their wealth is based on the 'last mile' of the commercial process: buying raw materials and manufacturing cheaply in third world countries, these countries realise their lucrative profits by adding value through finishing, packaging and marketing and then selling the branded product on to the end-user at a hugely inflated price.

The use of sophisticated global media techniques alongside a range of creative marketing activities are the lynchpins of this process.

Applying his observations on economic history and the development and impact of global marketing, Anholt presents a cogent plan for developing nations to benefit from globalization.

So long the helpless victim of capitalist trading systems, he shows that they can cross the divide and graduate from supplier nation to producer nation. Branding native produce on a global scale, making a commercial virtue out of perceived authenticity and otherness and fully capitalising on the 'last mile' benefits are key to this graduation and fundamental to forging a new global economic balance.

Anholt argues with a forceful logic, but also backs his hypothesis with enticing glimpses of this process actually beginning to take place.

Examining activities in India, Thailand, Russia and Africa among others, he shows the risks, challenges and pressures inherent in 'turning the tide', but above all he demonstrates the very real possibility of enlightened capitalism working as a force for good in global terms.

Content:

Something's going on; Why the rich get richer and the poor get poorer; Can a country cross the divide?; It's starting to happen; It isn't easy; When countries become brands; Change is in the air; How far should we take this?

Readership:

Practitioners, government and policy-makers worldwide, and the general public. Postgraduate and MBA courses in international business and international marketing.

Simon Anholt

Well known international branding and marketing thinker, Chairman of Earthspeak consultancy and adviser to various government bodies.


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