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Media360: Media is 'not a zero-sum game' says Claire Enders

Advertisers must remember that FMCG consumers live a "multi-layered existence" using up to 15 types of media a day, argues Claire Enders, the chief executive of Enders Analysis.

Claire Enders: the chief executive of Enders Analysis

Claire Enders: the chief executive of Enders Analysis

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Speaking about the future of media at Media360 last week, Enders said that despite the move into mobile and online media consumption, markets should remember that TV and print were far from dead.

She said: "Because of rising media consumption, there can be no zero sum game. A marketer is always going to be looking at how the target audience is really responding.

"They won’t respond in the way that you believe because they don’t live in a post-print, post-TV world. All the people that consume FMCG products are in a multi-layered existence with 15 different media a day."

Enders said that marketers should focus on demographic, regardless of media type.

People in the UK currently spend 120 minutes a day online, a figure that will rise to 180 minutes, or three hours, in the next six years, she said.

Enders added that the increase in online media had a downside for advertisers.

She said: "All demographics are interested in online media, but the fascinating element of it is where it’s ending up.

"Online viewing is concentrated in places where there really isn’t a lot of [advertising] monetisation.

"Netflix is driven by subscription income. Adult material, which is bigger than YouTube as a locus of video activity, does not typically carry ads from FMCG brands. The BBC iPlayer has yet to carry an ad either. It would be a wonderful platform for advertising."

"People with the choice are interested in high-quality stuff."

She said she expected the increase in time spent online to be concentrated around Facebook because "it is a platform that reaches so many adults and above all, it is the platform that reaches women".

Facebook has spawned an economic phenomenon of "sharing" services without the exchange of money, such as sharing childcare and carpooling, Enders noted. A survey last year claimed 33 million British people had shared services in this way, she said.

Enders added that this Facebook behaviour gave "the means for many female entrepreneurs to start very small businesses" and had "enormous economic potential".

This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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