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Coke Zero gets edgier in 'just add zero' revamp

Coca-Cola is revamping its zero sugar and zero calorie drink, Coke Zero, backed by a major ad campaign sporting the new strapline,"just add zero", as it seeks to attract young men and women.

Coke Zero: rolls out brand revamp

Coke Zero: rolls out brand revamp

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Coke claims it is targeting a "new demographic of young people that has emerged out of challenging times," who have a "positive outlook focused on living richer".

Coke Zero has traditionally been aimed at young men, while Diet Coke has been focused on women. It will now seek to get a new generation of both men and women engaged with the drink.

The campaign sports an updated visual identity, using a red circle at the centre of its design. The circle will provide a visual link across limited edition packaging, outdoor, digital and PR activity.

The ad shows a young guy navigating a series of situations in which "adding zero" significantly improves what’s going on around him. Adding zero to his two sisters results in the appearance of 20 of their attractive friends, while adding zero to a party of 100 turns into a festival of 1,000.

The act of adding a nought to everything changes however, when the young guy finds his love interest has added a zero to her own situation, turning her one love interest into a possible pool of ten men.

Brid Drohan-Stewart, marketing activation director, Coca-Cola GB, said: "Coke Zero has seen a healthy sales growth in the UK in a short space of time and now we’re marketing a new, edgier direction with the ‘Just add zero’ platform, which we believe is a life philosophy.

"For some people zero means nothing, but the ‘Just Add Zero’ campaign shows that things get bigger, better, faster and greater when you add zero. ‘Adding zero’ gives you more.

"This campaign speaks to people who share the same philosophy – the adventurers who always seek out possibilities in order to experience greater things. The video resonates with our audience and communicates their attitude."

 

This article was first published on marketingmagazine.co.uk

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