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Sony parodies 'balls' ad in Wimbledon campaign

Sony is revisiting its iconic "balls" TV ad in an online campaign to promote its 3D coverage of the Wimbledon finals.

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Created by Crayon, the campaign is spearheaded by a video featuring thousands of tennis balls bouncing through the streets of suburban Wimbledon, in the same way that Fallon's ad for Sony Bravia showed thousands of colourful balls bouncing through the streets of San Francisco.

The video will be supported by a national press campaign, as well as radio, eCRM and experiential activity, with 10,000 branded tennis balls being handed out in London.

Users will also be able to take part in a competition that challenges them to collect virtual tennis balls that have been placed on various web pages. Each ball collected will represent an entry into a competition, with prizes including tickets to the final, as well as a range of Sony 3D products.

Matt Coombe, the general manager of brand marketing at Sony UK, said: "This is a great creative idea that not only cleverly maximises nostalgia around a previous Sony campaign, but explodes the idea digitally without having to support it with TV. We’re really excited about the launch."

Sony will film the semi-finals and finals of the Wimbledon tennis championships in high-definition 3D for the first time in the competition's 125-year history.

This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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